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MediTEX Technology is an antimicrobial, antibacterial and odor-resistant Solutions company which specializes in the development, manufacturing and marketing of antimicrobial, antibacterial textiles for the government, healthcare & commercial  industry. MediTEX mission is to be an integral part of the comprehensive antimicrobial solutions necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria.
A recent University of Maryland research study revealed that 65% of medical personnel reported that they change their lab coats less than once a week, and a surprising 15% admitted they change their lab coats less than once a month. It’s not surprising that a staggering 97% of healthcare workers agreed that they are concerned about the presence of bacteria in healthcare facilities like theirs, as well as on medical textiles. Now, healthcare workers and patients can have greater peace of mind knowing that their medical textiles feature Microban antimicrobial protection that inhibits the growth of odor causing bacteria on the fabric, keeping MediTEX textiles cleaner and fresher.
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Media - In the News

Superbug Transmitted by Textiles Research Cites Clothing as Key Link in Spread  Infection. Read More

Does it matter what a doctor wears?
Does it matter what a doctor wears? 03/01/2012 - Absolutely. People trust doctors more when they wear that white coat. There are very few studies about the impact of physicians’ attire on patients’ confidence and trust. The objective of this study was to determine whether the way a doctor dresses is an important factor in the degree of trust and confidence among respondents. Conclusion: Respondents overwhelmingly favor physicians in professional attire with a white coat. Wearing professional dress (ie, a white coat with more formal attire) while providing patient care by physicians may favorably influence trust and confidence-building in the medical encounter.

Curious About Germs On Hospital Scrubs
A Crossover Trial of Antimicrobial Scrubs to Reduce Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Burden on Healthcare Worker Apparel. 02/08/2012 - Results: ...A difference in mean log methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) CFU count was found between study and control scrubs for leg cargo pocket (mean log CFUs, 11.84 control scrub vs 6.71 study scrub; Pp.0002), abdominal area (mean log CFUs, 11.35 control scrub vs 7.54 study scrub; Pp.0056), leg cargo pocket at the beginning of shift (mean log CFUs, 11.96 control scrub vs 4.87 study scrub; Pp.0028), and abdominal area pocket at the end of shift (mean log CFUs, 12.14 control scrubs vs 8.22 study scrub; Pp.0054). Conclusions: Study scrubs were associated with a 4–7 mean log reduction in MRSA burden but not VRE or GNRs. A prospective trial is needed to measure the impact of antimicrobial impregnated apparel on MRSA transmission rates... Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2012;33(3):000-000. 

Newly Cleaned Physician Uniforms and Infrequently Washed White Coats Have Similar Rates of Bacterial Contamination After an 8-Hour Workday:
Newly Cleaned Physician Uniforms and Infrequently Washed White Coats Have Similar Rates of Bacterial Contamination After an 8-Hour Workday: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 03/01/2011 - Bacterial contamination occurs within hours after donning newly laundered short-sleeved uniforms. After 8 hours of wear, no difference was observed in the degree of contamination of uniforms versus infrequently laundered white coats. Our data do not support discarding long-sleeved white coats for short-sleeved uniforms that are changed on a daily basis. 

ABSTRACT: Zygomycosis Outbreak Associated with Hospital Linens. 

Zygomycosis Outbreak Associated with Hospital Linens. 

The Role Played by Contaminated Surfaces in the Transmission of Nosocomial Pathogens 
The Role Played by Contaminated Surfaces in the Transmission of Nosocomial Pathogens.07/05/2011 - Studies in the 1970s and 1980s suggested that environmental surface contamination played a negligible role in the endemic transmission of healthcare-associated infections. However, recent studies have demonstrated that several major nosocomial pathogens are shed by patients and contaminate hospital surfaces at concentrations sufficient for transmission, survive for extended periods, persist despite attempts to disinfect or remove them, and can be transferred to the hands of healthcare workers. Evidence is accumulating that contaminated surfaces make an important contribution to the epidemic and endemic transmission of Clostridium difficile, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and norovirus and that improved environmental decontamination contributes to the control of outbreaks. Efforts to improve environmental hygiene should include enhancing the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection and reducing the shedding of pathogens. Further high-quality studies are needed to clarify the role played by surfaces in nosocomial transmission and to determine the effectiveness of different interventions in reducing associated infection rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2011;32(7):687-699. 

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